Welcome to The UIA Inventor Education Forum

UIA Daily Inventor Blog Posts

Page 1 of 34 1, 2, 3 ... 17 ... 34  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

I'm searching for something

Post  Admin on Wed 10 Apr 2013 - 22:02


As inventors we are always searching for something. Like Ponce De Leon, we tell ourselves the fountain of inventing youth is just around the corner if we just keep going.

But "searching" is a huge word in terms of inventing and it can mean many things. We can search for just the right invention, just the right solution to a problem, or even just the right company to take our great new idea to market.

What we see with new inventors most often are two definitions of the term "Search" and they normally get them mixed up with each other. Let's take a quick look at the two most popular forms of searching and make sure we're doing the right search at the right time.
Product Search and Patent Search are by far the most used search processes in the inventing industry. But they are also the most confusing to new inventors.

A "Product Search" Simply put, is the search for like products. This is hands down the most important search you can do (Yes patent people, I said it) far more important at the beginning stages than a patent search. (see....I said it again) At the end of the day this is business and if your great new idea is already on the market and doing well, you will need to think long and hard about pursuing it.
Conducting a product search using tools like the internet, catalogs, shopping sites, going to retailers, asking friends and family.... will give you a good sense if the ideas has already been developed and the data you need to make a good decision about moving forward with it.

A "Patent Search" on the other hand is an exercise in protection and courtesy. You search patents to see if the protection is available should you decide to move forward, and to ensure you show other people the respect of not infringing on the protections they have been granted.
Patent searches have NOTHING to do with the initial indication of commercial viability of a product. They play a very important role in the valuation of an idea, they may even play a role in how you take a product to the market. But they will in no any way give you a sense of viability - and in the initial stages of developing an idea into a product viability is crucial.

Next time you hear and inventor say "well just do a search" or someone say "I did a patent search" think to yourself what kind of search? Because a product search is always the first step, and although important in the process, patent searching falls a bit lower in the process.

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

Come on Honey....Please!

Post  Admin on Wed 10 Apr 2013 - 22:01

You may very well have uttered these words yourself at one point or another.

Please, let's just use the 401K money....Can you borrow some money from your parents?

Like many married inventors – you have no doubt found yourself in that unfortunate position were you’re asking your “significant other” to support this often unpredictable inventing journey. In most inventing families that support takes on many forms. Support could be anything from a simple smile, to a blank check - In my house for instance it’s “that’s great honey”…..and then the “Show me the money” look.

But that’s ok…we all go through this at one point or another. Maybe it’s the way our brains work. The ability to conger up the tenacity and faith that keeps us moving down the road towards what we know we can accomplish. After all - we can expect others to have the same level of faith in our abilities that we have. In most cases we can usually expect some support, even if it's just a smile.

Use your love of inventing and your ability to think outside thebox to further your families fortune. But be responsible about it. Take the time to educate yourself, to understand the risks, and to surround yourself with honest people willing to help.

Whatever you do - be a good steward of the support you do receive, after all they are counting on you.

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

World Peace for your Birthday

Post  Admin on Wed 10 Apr 2013 - 21:59


As brothers often do, my two sons enjoy a healthy dose of sarcasm in their interactions with each other.

One such interaction recently lead to an opportunity for my youngest son Nicholas to create a unique and thought filled Birthday gift for his older brother.

None of us really like to be asked what we want for our birthdays, so when Nick asked his brother what he wanted for his birthday this year the replay was "World Peace"

Most of us would have taken such an answer and gone off to buy a sweater. Nicholas however wanted to see just how close he could get to giving his brother what he had asked for.

He didn't get all the world's leaders to agree to put down their weapons, but he did get a significant number of people to pick up their Sharpies.

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

The UIA Thanks P3 for their support of inventor education

Post  Admin on Wed 10 Apr 2013 - 21:57


We are Product Placement and Promotions, LLC. At P3 we design communication and business development strategies specifically tailored to generate impact by taking into account positioning, promotional opportunities and marketing needs to make your name, a BRAND NAME. Our success comes from building solid relationships in various markets and creating programs that suit the needs of individual clients. P3 is truly a one-stop marketing shop, which covers ALL marketing needs, saving our client’s time and money.

P3 will assist in all facets of product development from design through launch. In this business, solid and trustworthy relationships are the keys to success. We work closely with several sourcing agents to insure the absolute lowest cost of goods sold, we can assist in the creation of packaging that works. We will write and produce your television spot as well as buy and place your media. We will assist in setting up your call centers or designing your website to maximize traffic.

Our management team has the experience and forged strong bonds with retail buyers of big box retailers such as, Kmart, Target, Wal-Mart and Walgreen’s and continue to experience successful airings on home shopping networks such as QVC and HSN. Having vendor numbers with both companies, we can introduce your product directly into the buyers as well as assist in new vendor set up processes. We work closely with Telebrands if you wish to license your product as an exit strategy instead of retail.

Product placement using pre-planned media to co-promote with accompany with synergy or television show whose storyline and character(s) align with your brand’s message and audience is a cost-efficient way to get an implied endorsement and a breakthrough campaign. A tie-in can be a more direct way to spur sales. It has been done most often to help launch a new product or line extension. We work with Dr. Gadget, one of America’s most trusted Consumer Brand Specialists’ to find new and trusted products for appearances on daytime talk shows such as “The View”, “Extra” with Mario Lopez, “The Wendy William’s Show” and more!

For additional information on Product Placement on Promotions, LLC. You can find us on Facebook and www.newproductplacement.com Marlo Gold President 561-932-0125 mgold@productpp.com

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

Are we related?

Post  Admin on Wed 10 Apr 2013 - 21:55


Homo Habilis is a well-known, but poorly defined species discovered in 1960, by the Leakey team in Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania.

Over the next four years the specimen was subjected to intense study by the multidisciplinary team of Louis Leakey, John Napier, and Phillip Tobias. In January 1964, the team announced the new species Homo habilis. The name was suggested by Raymond Dart, and means “handy man,” in reference to this hominids supposed tool making prowess.

This puts the 2.3 million year old "Human" as the oldest recorded inventor on the planet. One many scientist attribute to the inventor of Stone Tools.

That's where it all started folks, Homo Habilis emerging from a cave, forced to invent tools for survival.

Through the next 2 million years there would be much more inventing going on. The invention of fire, the wheel, weapons, even the transformation of basic tools through the Bronze and into the Iron age.

At the center of this evolution of innovation - our inventor ancestors. The men and women of our planet who made life survivable, and then livable for the rest of us.

We may not live in caves and dawn fur loin clothes any longer, but the impact of our inventing on those around us is no less important today than it was all those years ago.




Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

It's all in the name...

Post  Admin on Thu 4 Apr 2013 - 22:58


It really is all in the name – as people we tend to have a conservative bent to our naming - John, Thomas, Julie, Frank, and so on. Every once in a while you see a name that stands out from the rest. Take “Moon” Zappa for instance, or Gwyneth Paltrow’s little girl “Apple” names that don’t exactly fit into the main stream – but is that a bad thing?
Maybe not for a child, but it can be for an inventor trying to come up with a name for the product that will eventually emerge from the hard fought technology being developed in the basement.
Let’s start by looking at some product names that simply should have never made their way to the store shelf. What were they thinking?

Pee Cola (Beverage)
Spontex (sponges)


Poo (Potato chips)
Fridge Balls (air fresheners for your fridge)


Anusol (Cream…you can guess what kind)
Bimbo (Sandwich bread)


Wack-Off (Insect repellent)
Now in all fairness there has been a long standing debate in the marketing world about this issue. Some experts say only use names that are descriptive of your product, some say use names that are catchy and have nothing to do with your product, and still others say anything goes – use a name that will get “Top of Mind” (a marketing term that describes remembering something before something else) the wackier the better.


I tend to stay in the middle. In most cases I think a name should be somewhat descriptive of the use of a product simply because you have so little time to communicate value to the consumer and the name is a prime place to do that. Short of an obvious descriptive nature to the name, it should have some memory to it in terms of getting the consumer to think of it rather than the competitors. All in all I tend to use a set of simple rules to stay on the right track for naming a product.
1. Never name a product after a derogatory term and never use a term or phrase that could offend the consumer in any way.

2. Always keep it as short as possible – consumers are bombarded with images and things to remember, short and sweet will always win out over long and complicated

3. Funny works great when it can be used, but don’t force feed funny

4. Don’t be afraid to use a tag line to add additional information or act as a clarifier for the name itself


5. Complicated names make the consumer feel stupid – it may not be true, but they assume everyone else gets it and they don’t. This brings them right back to an earlier bad memory and creates an indelible line between that bad memory and your product – not good for sales.

6. Hooked on Phonics – the consumer has to be able to phonetically pronounce your product name. If they can’t, they feel stupid, and there’s that line again back to an unhappy time in Mr. Smith’s 3rd grade English class where all the other kids made fun of them. I knew a lady once years ago who for 20 years refused to buy Neapolitan Ice Cream because she thought it said “Napoleon”. She had taken a history class and learned that Napoleon was not such a nice person. She made a mental link between the name and the product. All because she couldn’t pronounce the name phonetically. This may be an extreme case, but it’s true.

Now these are just my rules, and for you they would be suggestions. Unfortunately there are no "one size fits all" guidelines for naming products. Rather a set of socially driven boundaries and memory tricks we try to work within.
Remember, the name adds a level of value to the product, so making it something the consumer can smile about is always helpful to the purchasing decision since at the end of the day the act of purchasing is all about turning their emotion into your cash.

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

Calling all inventors....

Post  Admin on Thu 4 Apr 2013 - 22:55


Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

She's Hot!

Post  Admin on Thu 4 Apr 2013 - 22:54


I recently saw a show on TV about how the mind works. It was fascinating to think about how the mind processes data – but more specifically how the mind fills in the blanks when real information is missing.

Here’s a great example of what I’m talking about. What do you see in this picture?

Like most of us you likely see a woman’s backside. Why? - Because your mind took the basic information and filled in what it didn't have with assumptions. We as Inventors often do the same thing.


As the inventor makes the transition to the business world with this new found innovation we quickly realize it’s a world we know little about. So we enter armed with a few bits of real information to work with, but largely leaving our minds to do what they do best. Filling in the blanks with assumptions and force fed images of what the mind is now telling us is our reality.
The problem is, just like your mind tells you this is a picture of a woman’s backside – the mind is often wrong. This is in fact, a picture of a pair of shoes – Ahhhh, now you see it!

The same is true with the assumptions we make about the business end of the inventing industry. Taking a little bit of known information and allowing your mind to fill in the blanks is a really bad idea in business. You need to take the time to educate yourself on the real processes and information associated with taking an invention to the market.

Don’t listen to your friends who know as little as you do about the process, don’t listen to your Dog, or your Cat. Take the time to fill your mind with real information so it’s not left to fill in the blanks with assumptions that could later cost you a great opportunity or a lot of money.

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

The UIA Welcomes KDK Consumer Solutions

Post  Admin on Thu 4 Apr 2013 - 22:52


With operations in the USA and China, KDK Technology specializes in manufacturing and multi-level distribution of innovative consumer products. Our collaborative efforts have helped produce dramatic successes for our clients, and secure impressive sales for select start-up and early stage organizations.

KDK offers incomparable support to inventors and start-up companies in the fields of consumer electronics, toys, sporting goods (cut n sew), furniture, home goods, housewares and "As Seen on TV" categories.

Our comprehensive understanding of Asian and US cultures provides a winning combination of expertise and experience resulting in scaled-up manufacturing and marketplace processes. Our expertise has resulted in a variety of consumer products surpassing the million dollars in sales benchmark for our clients.

Gary Kellmann, founder of KDK Technology explains, "We have been pushed to do things a little differently. We have seen the Asian supply chain evolve to encompass much more challenging factors such as higher standards of living for workers, training of factory workers for specific processes, and monetary inflation with more demanding environmental and pricing benchmarks from the world markets. All of these factors have pushed our company to strive and establish new standards of excellence at every step along the way."

KDK Technology has been enjoying success since 1991. We are experts in assisting select entrepreneurs and early phase start-ups reach optimal success in the 21st century marketplace. The KDK team utilizes extensive manufacturing and sales networks to build a foundation for their clients success! http://www.kdkcs.com/

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

PICK YOUR SPOT AND GO!

Post  Admin on Thu 4 Apr 2013 - 22:50


It may be obvious to you, but it wasn’t to me. There is a simple, no nonsense way to get what you want. Decide, then find a way. In my house we say, “Pick your spot and GO!”

So often we want something but we do nothing to get it. We have a goal but we don’t move toward achieving that goal. We wish. We lament all the obstacles in our way. We identify all the reasons why we can’t, such as: I don’t have enough time. I can’t afford to, right now. If only the kids were older/younger. I don’t know how. I have no experience. I’m too short/tall/old/young.

Take a look at the rock climber in the picture. Standing at the bottom of the rock he may have said to himself, “I wish I could get to top of that rock.” And looking up he probably saw an area with no footholds, a really steep part, a big drop, a scary crack. He could have walked away wishing he could have climbed that rock. OR – instead he could use all his knowledge, skill and tools to tackle it and deal with one challenge at a time.
There are a million reasons NOT to do something.

What would happen if you decide to go for it? Once you decide then you start solving the problems one by one. You work to find a way around the obstacles. If it’s really what you want, you’ll find a way. Don’t wait until the smoke clears and the seas part. Don’t wait for what you want to fall out of the sky at the absolute perfect time. Make it happen.
In the words of Zeke Topanga from Surf’s Up, “Don’t give up. Find a way. Because that’s what winners do.”

From the Blog Peeling the Orange http://peelingtheorange.com/2013/02/25/pick-your-spot-and-go/

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

Wow..what a week.

Post  Admin on Sat 30 Mar 2013 - 8:58


For the first time I'm aware of in the history of our industry, a delegation of people went to Congress specifically to tell the story of the Independent Inventor.

For those who may not know. The UIA works under three tenets. First, the development and distribution of free educational programs for inventors. Second, the building of relationships between inventors and industry to ensure a clean and safe path to market. Thirdly, giving inventors voice through legislative advocacy at the local, state, and federal levels.

It is this third tenet that brought a small group of dedicated UIA staff to Washington DC this week.
Walking the halls of congress going from one meeting to another for two days straight was a daunting task to be sure. But it was also a huge responsibility and true honor.

For it was in that moment, in those meetings, and for that instant we captured the minds and hearts of lawmakers who connected to us as inventors. They thought about their uncle, their father or mother, even their brother or sister as we laid out the issues facing our industry, not in terms of Democrat or Republican politics, but in terms of humanity.

We told them about predatory business practices and intellectual property issues, but the most important part of the narrative was getting them to understand the indelible relationship between inventors and the society we serve - and when we were done, they understood and they pledged their support for our industry. They pledged to work with us to strengthen the current laws, give inventor voice to other legislative initiatives, and to ensure we are always remembered in the minds of our nation's leaders.

We have a long way to go before we see the kinds of reforms that rid our industry of predatory practices and ensure proper representation on national issues - but to paraphrase Neil Armstrong - this was one small step for Congress and one giant leap for inventors.

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

R&D Tax Credit

Post  Admin on Sat 30 Mar 2013 - 8:56

In January, the tech industry scored big when the fiscal cliff agreement extended the Research and Development Tax Credit. This credit provides incentives for companies to do research & development in the U.S. The deal made the credit, which expired in 2011, retroactive for 2012 and extended through 2013.

Technology trade groups that represent Google, Microsoft and Cisco lauded the Research and Development Tax Credit extension. The Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) and the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) said the Research & Development Tax Credit is key to maintaining the United States’ position as a leader in the global tech industry.
This, unfortunately, is not the first time this tax credit has expired, only to be put back into place retroactively. Since the credit’s original expiration date of December 31, 1985, the credit has expired eight times and has been extended 13 times. The current extension expired on December 31, 2011.


This lack of permanency has kept the Research and Development Tax Credit in a constant state of flux, though Congress has consistently extended it since 1981. Businesses would rather see the Research & Development Tax Credit made permanent and strengthened — they argue that other countries are providing more lucrative Research & Development tax breaks.
“The fact that the R&D credit was a cornerstone of the fiscal cliff package bodes well for the industry,” said Kevin Richards, Senior Vice-President of Federal Government Affairs at TechAmerica, an industry group. “But we’re going to continue to underscore the need for permanency, because we think there is a direct correlation between U.S. competitiveness and job creation.”

The federal government currently allots more than $9 billion for the Research & Development Tax Credit. It is offered for businesses in many different industries, including: software, architecture, construction, agriculture, food production, and manufacturing, amongst many others. The tax incentive is popular on both sides of the aisle and is widely seen as critical to businesses and the economy.

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

Need Funding?

Post  Admin on Sat 30 Mar 2013 - 8:54


$150K Pitch Fest –Last Chance to sign up for potential funding—April 12th!
THE VAULT, the premier pitch event of the south, takes place April 25, 2013—and time is running out! Don’t let your idea stay idle! The deadline for entry into THE VAULT is April 12, 2013.

If your idea is the Next Big Thing and is ready for the Next Big Step—you don’t want to miss the opportunity to participate in THE VAULT.


If your idea has the x-factor--that thing that sets you apart from all of the competition, THE VAULT is waiting for you.

Held during INNOV8, an eight-day technology and innovation festival in Lafayette, LA THE VAULT is an open-pitch live event with approved applicants vying for at least $150,000 in pledged commitments from InventureWorks’ panel of angel investors. This rapid-fire idea pitch event is designed to reward people and their big ideas with a shot at the big time: an opportunity for funding and the expertise to help bring their idea to market.

How does it all go down? Five qualifying contestants will present their product or business innovations in front of motivated investors and a cheering audience. A brief video of the product/business will precede a short live pitch followed by Q&A from the investors. If they like what they see and hear, groups will negotiate a deal on the spot!

THE VAULT is ready for you and time is running out! Apply now by downloading the free InventureKit from www.inventureworks.com/submit which contains a Mutual-NDA and Idea Application form. Fill them out and you’re in the queue for review. It’s that easy. If your innovation is not protected enough to be presented publicly, please apply anyway and your product can be pitched privately

The deadline for entry into THE VAULT is April 12, 2013. Don’t Miss out!

“THE VAULT 2013 is happening soon, and innovators don’t have much time left. Inventors, investors, growing businesses and anyone who dares to dream big is encouraged to submit their application now,” says InventureWorks Chief Idea Officer Pete Prados, “We still have limited space and all qualified applicants are welcome.”

Investors interested in participating should contact InventureWorks Chief Idea Officer Pete Prados at 337-205-8787 or via email: pete@inventureworks.com

InventureWorks, LLC, located in Lafayette Louisiana, provides resources, consultation, and partnership opportunities to anyone who dares to dream big. Visit www.inventureworks.com to learn more and download the free Inventure Kit.

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

Quilting Class?

Post  Admin on Sat 30 Mar 2013 - 8:49

Well, I had quilting class last night – I know, Quilting Class? Yes… that’s what I call it anyway.

You see I have been working on this quilting ruler for several months now and I’m almost there. I spent hours and hours talking to quilters over that time getting dozens of prospectives and much data on issues of size and shape and color. What I heard were a few things, most notably that the wanted bright colors!

I also learned that you don’t mess with these broads, they want what they want and my job is to give it to them. So like a nice young man I went off to develop a quilting ruler in bright colors. The rulers have always been done in yellow, so I selected bright Green and Pink to complete the set. It took some doing, but I finally got the samples back in these colors and off I went to quilting class. I walked in and my little quilting harem gathered round to take a look.

Imagine my surprise when they hated them! I mean really hated them. I was befuddled at what I was hearing. After all, I had talked to many quilters who all said they loved the colors. So what gives? Why is this group telling me they hate them?

I asked that simple question – The answer – “We love the colors Mark, we would just NEVER use them” Then they proceeded to take out about 30 pieces of fabric and lay them on a table. Slowly moving the ruler from one end of the table to the other, I was amazed as I watched the ruler “disappear” about 25% of the time. A text-book case of “Function hates Form”

The good news is my new found friends have no shortage of things they would like me to invent for what I’m finding out is a huge industry that is largely ignored.

So at least in the near term I guess if you need me on Tuesday or Thursday nights you can find me at the club.....The quilting club.

Maybe next week they’ll let me sew something….naaaa

Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

Inventor protection by State

Post  Admin on Tue 26 Mar 2013 - 6:49


Do you know what California, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, and Virginia have in common?

Not only are they states (for those of you who may be geographically challenged) but they are special states. In fact, they are the only eleven in the country to take the time and effort necessary to pass laws specifically designed to protect inventors.

That's right - only 21% of the fifty US states that form our country (plus the District of Columbia) have laws on their books giving additional protection to inventors. These laws range from old and outdated to strong and protective, but that's okay - at least they are laws on the books.


For inventors in states where there are no such laws it's a much worse situation. Their only protection comes from a dependency on the Federal Inventor Protection Act of 1999 - see blog article We need a new law http://inventoropinion.blogspot.com/2012/07/we-need-new-law.html - and force feeding inventor protection into standard consumer protection laws.
In a day and age when we do a great deal of business with people we never meet, from states we have never been to - It's important to remember that law applies to the state where you live. So if an inventor company sells you a bad product or service they are bound by the law in your state not necessarily in the state they are operating out of.
The matrix below shows state by state the current laws. If you don't see one in your state call the Attorney General and ask what kind of protections you enjoy and why they are not part of the eleven states that do protect inventors.





Admin
Admin

Posts: 603
Join date: 2011-02-19

http://uiaforum.userboard.net

Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 34 1, 2, 3 ... 17 ... 34  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum